image.jpeg
Photo: Waymarking.com
Fort Myers High School, Fort Myers, Florida
​A Florida high school student’s text message resulted in police arresting another student and charging him with selling marijuana on campus.
The Fort Myers Police Department got an anonymous text on Tuesday about a student selling marijuana from his car and backpack at Fort Myers High School, reports Naples News.
After cops notified the principal, Tyler Lecky, 17, was yanked from class and searched. Two plastic bags of marijuana were discovered in his backpack and car. One contained 15.7 grams of cannabis, and the other contained 7.9 grams.
Lecky was arrested and charged with possession of marijuana over 20 grams, and for sale of marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school.
Just last month, the cops gave students at the school “tip” cards encouraging them to anonymously text “crime tips” to police and “keep their school safe.”
I guess they feel it’s important to reach future citizens of the police state at a young age, so they can be safely inculcated in informant culture and will turn into nice obedient worker drones in the future.

“This is exactly what we are looking for,” enthused an excited Police Chief Doug Baker. “It’s their personal safety channel to alert police to a possible danger. We don’t know who sent us this tip but their actions should be commended.”
“The goal of giving the students the cards was to increase awareness and prevention of violence in all forms whether it is drugs, fights, weapons, harassment, bullying or other safety concerns,” Naples News helpfully tells us.
So there you have it, folks: Somehow, the contemplation-inducing herb marijuana equals violence! I guess it must be so, since I read it in the Naples News.
“Texting allows people to notify police when calling may not be feasible or safe,” says Naples News, obviously quoting directly from a cop press release.
“It also helps combat the anti-snitch era,” the paper tells us. Yeah. Good luck with that, guys.
The Fort Myers Police Department’s text snitch line is at C-R-I-M-E-S (274637); use the word FMPD in the body of the text.
Maybe someone should tell ‘em to pursue real, dangerous criminals instead of some dude selling nickel sacks at school.